View Poll Results: Would you welcome LBJ back?

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  • Not a chance

    203 39.65%
  • Sure, everyone deserves a second chance

    173 33.79%
  • Not at first, but would warm to it

    141 27.54%
  • Only if its in a year past 2014

    12 2.34%
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  1. #2521
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    Default Re: The Lebron Safari 2014

    Great read and i dont know how any sane sports fan can watch first take.


    In October, Doug Gottlieb, a radio host and basketball analyst who'd decamped for CBS the previous month after nine years with ESPN, went on The Dan Patrick Show anddropped something of a truth bomb about his time in Bristol:

    I was told specifically, "You can't talk enough Tebow." I would jokingly throw it into a segment. "I gotta find 15 seconds here to talk about Tebow, all right let's move on and talk about Major League Baseball."

    Later, he said:

    Is it ridiculous how much you have to talk about Tebow? Yeah! But for whatever reason people can't get enough of that story, and they kind of stoke the fire—that's kind of what ESPN does.

    Gottlieb was referring to the network's yearlong infatuation with Tebow, a player who hasn't made much actual news since he was traded to the Jets in March. Bristol executives have decided that what we want—or what we should want—is Tebow. "They want to own the Tebow story," said Jim Miller, the author of the ESPN oral history Those Guys Have All The Fun. "They want to put their watermark on it."

    This helps explain why, over the summer, ESPN dispatched veteran reporter Sal Paolantonio and a crew to cover Jets camp as if it were the run-up to the Super Bowl. ("ESPN embarrassed themselves," Dan Patrick, who spent 18 years in Bristol, said of ESPN's flood-the-zone coverage in Florham Park.) This helps explain why ESPN2's First Take referred to Tim Tebow more than seven dozen times in late May even though there was absolutely no Tebow news to report on. This helps explain why SportsCenter covered Tim Tebow's 25th birthday like a moon landing. This helps explain why it seemed perfectly reasonable to a SportsCenter anchor to ask in-studio guest Liam Neeson whether Tim Tebow should be the Jets' starting quarterback even though Liam Neeson had no clue what he was talking about. This helps explain how ESPN wound up breaking Tim Tebow news to, yes, Tim Tebow.

    The story of how ESPN fell in love with Tim Tebow is really the story of a breakup, between ESPN and the business of reporting the news.

    * * *

    The Tebow phenomenon—that is, the sustained celebrity of a football player of only moderate ability—says as much about ESPN as it does about the quarterback himself. For the better part of a decade, the narrative about ESPN has held that the integrity of the news operation is subordinate to the Worldwide Leader's business concerns. (Just think back to The Decision or to the Bonds on Bonds docuseries before that, the one that ceded editorial control to the Giants outfielder and left Pedro Gomez, ESPN's Bonds beat guy, pressing his nose up against his own network's window.) Given that ESPN has deals with nearly every major league—and ignores the ones with which it doesn't have deals—the question has become inescapable: How can the company produce honest journalism when it's in business with, well, everybody?

    ESPN has proven it can—the coverage of the replacement-ref fiasco in the wake of the Green Bay-Seattle Monday night game was a high point—but in recent months something began to shift. There was Tebowmania, of course, but more quietly there were several incidents of journalistic malpractice that were notable not for the egregiousness of the crimes but for ESPN's total indifference to them (about which more later). We weren't the only ones to notice. A member of the newsroom was just as baffled as we were by the silence of a media company that blankets the office in memos at the drop of a zipper.


    Why does any of this matter? For one thing, journalism is in the company's DNA. It's no exaggeration to say that the modern ESPN was built on top of its robust news division. When now-executive editor John Walsh—an editor at theWashington Post's Style section in its heyday, an editor at '70s-era Rolling Stone, and a founding editor of the short-lived, much-loved Inside Sports—arrived on Bristol's campus in the late 1980s, he declared that a strong newsroom would give the station the identity it had lacked to that point. As he staffed up, Walsh cared more about reporting chops than TV readiness: Andrea Kremer (hired from NFL Films), Robin Roberts (from local TV and radio in Atlanta), Peter Gammons (fromThe Boston Globe and Sports Illustrated), Jimmy Roberts (from ABC News), Chris Mortensen (theAtlanta Journal-Constitution and The National). Print people? Some inexperience? Didn't matter. Talent did.

    ESPN left its mark on the major stories of the early '90s—Pete Rose, Magic Johnson, the O.J. saga—and competitors noticed. They worried about ESPN's reach. Well, actually, not just its reach. They feared its audience and its journalistic chops. Here's The Franchise: A History of Sports Illustrated Magazine author Michael MacCambridge talking in Those Guys Have All the Fun:

    [Former Sports Illustrated managing editor] Mark Mulvoy was just obsessed with whatever ESPN was doing. A lot of writers at Sports Illustrated couldn't understand that and asked, 'Why are we so worried about ESPN?' but to Mulvoy's credit, he saw that the paradigm was changing and the primacy that Sports Illustrated had enjoyed in the media world was being usurped by ESPN. And the reason was not because ESPN was a cable network with x number of viewers; the reason was Walsh had invested SportsCenter with a journalistic authority that had not existed before he got there, and that did not exist anywhere else where people did sports reporting on TV. Mulvoy was scared, and in retrospect, he was right.

    David Hill, the longtime head of Fox Sports, has called Walsh ESPN's "secret weapon." Longtime Disney chief executive Michael Eisner, in his 1998 autobiography Work In Progress, said Walsh's hiring was one of the two turning points for ESPN (the other was getting part of the NFL's Sunday night package in 1987). Walsh's genius, in Eisner's estimation? He "recognized that it was possible to lure viewers to ESPN with strong reporting about sports, even in instances where the network didn't have broadcast rights to a big event," Eisner writes. And it helps when the centerpiece show, SportsCenter, runs three times a day. This seems obvious now, but think about how you watched sports at the time: You watched them live. ESPN provided a self-contained alternative—highlights, reportage, and analysis—without having to open its wallet to buy every "big event," though eventually ESPN would grow profitable enough to want to do that, too. It was a deliriously effective business model. Today, ESPN is worth $40 billion, about $5 billion more than the combined value of every NFL team.

    "You can't say enough about how important their news operation is," said Miller. "If you take John Walsh and [director of news] Vince Doria out of its history, ESPN is a fundamentally different place. It's a less important place, it's a less successful place."

    But that success has created problems for the newsroom, which operates within a distortion field that the company's size creates. Doria, for instance, recently suggested to media reporter Ed Sherman that passionate local hockey fandom "really doesn't transfer much" to the "national discussion," which overlooked the fact that ESPN is the national discussion. If the network doesn't talk about hockey—and the evidence is strong that, lacking an NHL television contract, it won't—the nation doesn't talk about hockey, either.

    And how much power does the newsroom have, anyway? One of the SportsCenter anchors who hosted the bizarre Tebow birthday bash said that she wasn't that into the idea. But she didn't have a choice. Here's Sage Steele speaking to SportsBiz USA (emphasis mine):

    When it's Tim Tebow, when it's Tiger Woods, when it's Brett Favre, the numbers are such they support the bosses' decision to do this stuff. Not all the time. We can sit there in the newsroom and argue all we want. Which many of us do. When they come out and say, 'OK Sage, fine, here's a rating,' what do I say? What do I say? I can't fight that.

    […]

    Unfortunately, when we do stories in that manner, I can't argue with fans (who criticize ESPN). I can't. So hopefully we can squash all that talk and cover more teams…I agree with people who are complaining. But I also agree with our bosses who say, 'OK, it's the business. Look at the ratings. They might hate it. But they're still watching.' People might hate Skip Bayless. But they're still watching.

    As a result, the steady stream of Tebow non-news is as much a part of ESPN's identity now as Chris Berman doing NFL highlights on Sunday night.

    "It's great when they choose to flood the zone on a story that's really important—like the Pete Rose trial early in their history," Jim Miller said. "Nobody can do it the way they can, that's fantastic. But when they do it to a story that doesn't necessarily warrant the attention they're giving it, it gets confusing to viewers. It hurts your pedigree.

    "It's kind of out of whack," he continued. "You risk losing an identity for a news organization that they've been building for 20 years."

    * * *

    The story of ESPN's Tebow obsession really begins last year. In September 2011, ESPN2's First Take, having gone through several different lives (a faint imitation of a morning TV show, a debate-cum-variety show), went to an all-debate format starring former newspaper columnist Skip Bayless. This new iteration wasn't all that popular with other producers in Bristol, a source said, but the decision was made after ESPN consulted a focus group.

    "We focus-grouped it to people and realized pretty quickly that viewers wanted debate," hot-shotFirst Take producer Jamie Horowitz told Men's Journal. "In particular, they wanted to see Skip debate."

    Producers around the network saw it the same way a lot of us do: as willful crap. Staged disagreement. On the show, Bayless would be pitted against another panelist—often a black counterpart, including Stephen A. Smith, who is now the full-time co-host—and "debate" him or her, Crossfire-style, on the sports topic of the moment. Around the time that Bayless become the country's most visible and outspoken Tebow supporter—which ultimately spawned this abomination and the 4 million clicks that went with it—ratings for the show began to climb.

    Before long, a source told me, higher-minded Bristol producers swallowed their pride and acknowledged that something was working. And the producers who really took notice? The ones who worked on the live morning edition of ESPN's SportsCenter, which runs opposite First Take. The morningSportsCenter's producers had a problem:First Take was eating into its ratings. In September 2011, the 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. editions of SportsCenter had 636,000 more viewers a day than the same time slot that First Take owned on ESPN2, according to data from Nielsen. Over the next six months, a period that stretched from Tebow's emergence in Denver through his trade to New York, First Take narrowed that deficit each month. By March, when Tim Tebow was traded to the Jets, the SportsCenter lead was down to 182,000 viewers—less than a third of what its margin had been.

    A programming battle ensued. Morning SportsCenter producers "noticed that First Take was killing them in ratings with Tebow stuff, so they made a conscious effort to deliver more Tebow," the source said. "ESPN is a competitive environment and the competition betweenSportsCenter and First Take is very real."

    It resulted in the sort of skirmishes that you might find ESPN fighting outside the company. At times, SportsCenter producers made sure that certain NFL analysts weren't available for First Take, the source said. When SportsCenter went all-in on Tebow during Jets training camp in a way, some folks in Bristol saw it as a move to neutralize First Take.

    "Producers were looking to duplicate the success of First Take," said our Bristol insider. "Given what the ratings were, you would have been an idiot not to talk Tebow. Decisions to talk Tebow were conscious and deliberate."

    A small, prideful ratings battle had metastasized around the network. ESPN had become the source for Tebow news, whether it bled into SportsCenter or into its various NFL shows or its Monday night pre-game show or its NFL reporters' Twitter feeds or its dot-com stories or its SportsNation polls.

    And what dawned on a segment of the newsroom was something that would've seemed absurd even five years ago: Skip Bayless and Stephen A. Smith were indirectly setting the editorial agenda for the biggest platform in the sports world. As our source put it to me, First Take's ratings surge late last year "completely changed" the look of ESPN.

    * * *

    Meanwhile, there were smaller moments that, taken as a whole, suggested ESPN was long past caring about its news operation. A litany:

    http://ganja.gawkerassets.com/assets/v10.deadspin.com/img/bullet.png);">Our old friend, Sarah Phillips, was a weekly contributor to ESPN's website while also moonlighting as a sort of social-media huckster. The red flags were there when she was hired—a lack of experience, a trail of accusations in the message boards of the betting website where she briefly contributed—but she was given a column anyway because, as she put it, "they thought I was pretty, quick witted, and knew my stuff."
    http://ganja.gawkerassets.com/assets/v10.deadspin.com/img/bullet.png);">Lynn Hoppes, an ESPN senior writer and former senior editor (he was the guy who recruitedthe scam artist mentioned above), was caught copying-and-pasting from Wikipedia and occasionally from press releases, too. ESPN called Hoppes lazy, but it turns out no editors over there could be bothered with updating any of his stories that we flagged. There are no editors' notes appended to Hoppes's stories; no corrections or links or attributions or clarifications. They exist exactly as they did before our initial story was published. He remains employed.
    http://ganja.gawkerassets.com/assets/v10.deadspin.com/img/bullet.png);">In July, a German soccer player Lukas Podolski claimed that an interview posted to ESPN's Soccernet never actually happened. The story was removed from the web, and all Bristol had to say was that the interview was conducted by a "freelance contributor," and that the company was looking into "sourcing questions." A few weeks after the incident, I asked ESPN for an update; a spokesman gave me the same statement that was trotted out after Bristol deleted the story. Was the interview made up? Was it conducted when Podolski thought it was off the record? Who knows?
    http://ganja.gawkerassets.com/assets/v10.deadspin.com/img/bullet.png);">Later that month, a SportsCenter anchor read on air, word for word, without attribution,something written by RealGM.com about Dwight Howard. An ESPN spokesman said steps were being taken to prevent it from happening again.
    http://ganja.gawkerassets.com/assets/v10.deadspin.com/img/bullet.png);">Three weeks later, it happened again.
    http://ganja.gawkerassets.com/assets/v10.deadspin.com/img/bullet.png);">In September, ESPN's soccer blog initially failed to credit an SI writer, who raised a small fuss over the omission. Poynter gave ESPN a slap on the wrist for that one.
    http://ganja.gawkerassets.com/assets/v10.deadspin.com/img/bullet.png);">The same month, ESPN scooped itself when a video posted to ESPN.com broke the news that prized college hoops recruit Demetrius Jackson had elected to go to Notre Dame. The video was quickly yanked. Why? Jackson's announcement was scheduled to be broadcast exclusively by ESPNU later that evening—a staged event that for obvious reasons was more important to ESPN than the news itself.
    These cover the waterfront of journalistic malfeasance: plagiarism, fabrication, a hiring cluster&$#%#&@!, business decisions masquerading as news judgment, business decisions overridingnews judgment. Taken individually, none of these missteps is pervasively illuminating. All newsrooms screw up. But here's why the recent incidents tell us lots about how ESPN regards journalism: nothing happened.

    At any newsroom around the country, these dust-ups would prompt a self-administered proctology exam. There'd be earnest committee assignments, standards-and-practices reviews, a "Letter to Our Readers" or two. None of the mea culpas really matter in the grand scheme of things—mistakes will go on happening no matter how many seminars the Poynter Institute convenes on the subject—but the point is to let your readers and colleagues know that you're deeply concerned about these things, that somewhere a standard is being upheld. But if any of this were happening in Bristol, it would come as a surprise to the rank and file in the newsroom.

    "What's funny is that as soon as the Steve Phillips [sex scandal] went down, they were very proactive about informing us on company policies and all that jazz," said one ESPN insider. "This?" the source went on, referring to Hoppes, Phillips, and the quote fabrication. "Crickets."

    * * *

    "It is a business first and foremost," Bruce Feldman, a 16-year veteran of ESPN who left for CBS last year, told me. "The people who run the company told me as much when I was going through it with them. There's still an element of ESPN that does journalism and there are some people there who are really good journalists. But above all it is a business."

    Feldman ran into his own problems with ESPN. (Long story short, for those who don't remember the "Free Bruce" episode: Feldman told ESPN brass that he was writing a book with then-Texas Tech coach Mike Leach. ESPN brass approved. Then when Leach decided to sue ESPN over its coverage of the Adam James affair, network execs ignored the fact they had given Feldman permission and suspended him. He chose to leave the network.)

    "ESPN serves two masters—entertainment and journalism, information—and depending on the day, we're probably only serving one of those," said one ESPN insider. "We can't be purely journalistic because we have too many business interests with the subject we're supposed to cover objectively. But in a way, it's a copout. We move the journalistic line when it suits us."

    And occasionally that line grades into incoherence. On Oct. 8, in anticipation of the Texans-Jets Monday night game, which was broadcast on ESPN, ESPN.com splashed a 3,100-word Skip Bayless story answering the question no one was asking: Why is Skip Bayless such a staunch supporter of Tim Tebow? During the pre-game show, there were segments devoted to Tebow. An ESPN New York Jets beat reporter breathlessly tweeted that Tebow was throwing more in pre-game warm-ups than he ever had before and this had to mean something.

    What was it that Doug Gottlieb told Dan Patrick? He said "they kind of stoke the fire—that's kind of what ESPN does." That's not quite right, though. On this Monday night, ESPN didn't just stoke the fire. ESPN was the fire, the fireplace, the poker being jabbed at the coals, and the coals, too. The newsroom was covering a "story" that another wing had manufactured.

    As Dan Patrick told Gottlieb: "They've lost that credibility, a large portion of the credibility of covering news. I think that it's now: 'What's trending?' Focus groups. You're trying to create things there."

    In the end? Tebow saw seven snaps for a team that lost and fell to 2-3. During the game, ESPN's stat line at the bottom indicated that Tebow was 0 for 1 passing because a receiver dropped the ball. And it turns out he was throwing all those balls in the pre-game because he was a little bored. Game 2 of the Orioles-Yankees ALDS ran opposite the Texans-Jets game, but 14 million viewers tuned in to watch football anyway—about a million more than the Monday Night Football average. It was a bad night for journalism, but a good one for ESPN.

    http://deadspin.com/5929361/how-espn...=recirculation

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  3. #2522
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    Default Re: The Lebron Safari 2014

    Kind of a long winded fluff piece on ESPN, lol. It's not exactly new news that the "E" in their name stands for Entertainment, and the "N" does not stand for News.

    I was hoping they'd expose something actually interesting, like why so many ESPN pundits brushed the steroids scandal under the rug and scoffed at Jose Canseco rather than investigated his claims and all the various incidents that occurred leading up to it.
    Last edited by Jon; 11-13-2012 at 08:52 AM.

  4. #2523
    Where are we going? warddj86's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Lebron Safari 2014


  5. #2524
    Situational Stopper SkaakS's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Lebron Safari 2014

    Thought this was an interesting discussion on 'Super Teams' from the Open Court crew. Discussion starts at the 25:20 mark.


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  7. #2525
    IT'S TRIBE TIME NOW!!! Pyro's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Lebron Safari 2014

    Is that Jodie Sweetin in the picture at the top of the page?

  8. #2526
    i'm THAT dude jay_em's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Lebron Safari 2014

    Quote Originally Posted by SkaakS View Post
    Thought this was an interesting discussion on 'Super Teams' from the Open Court crew. Discussion starts at the 25:20 mark.

    A couple things on that superteams discussion,

    -Shaq and Charles both left organizations in their prime for opportunities elsewhere both got to that next rung in their new home
    -Chris Webber essentially started the play with your friends and form a super team during his Fab 5 days
    -Kenny's right free agency now is different and less restrictive than during the 80's/90's. and there's still really only a handfull of teams with legit championship aspirations each season which is the same as the 80s/90's
    -Kerr's right its good for the league, but bad for the smaller markets.

    -Going back to something Shaq and Chuck said about front office manufactured superteams vs player manufactured superteams...what should players stuck in those no hope situations do? Sit back and watch the Lakers/Celtics of the league continue to do Jedi mind trick bad front offices into league shifting trades, watch other teams tank and/or luck their way into superteams (see Okc, Sa)? In my opinion no, you take your career, legacy and championship aspirations into your own hand.

    Players have long before forced their way into better situations this (player created superteams) is just the logical evolution of the sport. If it takes Super Teams to win championships, why would a player w/ championship desires and expired/expiring deal sit back and watch other Super Teams be created around them thus pushing their teams down the rung of championship contenders?

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  10. #2527
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    Default Re: The Lebron Safari 2014

    My favorite quote during that video: "He could have recruited people to Cleveland" - Chris Webber.

    That's been said before, but I think it needs to be stamped in everybody's mind. LeBron didn't want to stay in Cleveland regardless about winning or losing.

    EDIT: Anybody else see pages 170 and 171? I click them and it brings me right back to page 169.

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  12. #2528
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    Default Re: The Lebron Safari 2014

    Quote Originally Posted by CavsRules View Post
    My favorite quote during that video: "He could have recruited people to Cleveland" - Chris Webber.

    That's been said before, but I think it needs to be stamped in everybody's mind. LeBron didn't want to stay in Cleveland regardless about winning or losing.

    EDIT: Anybody else see pages 170 and 171? I click them and it brings me right back to page 169.
    Yup I'm getting this problem too, a little annoying lol

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  14. #2529
    Get Boobied' CavsRules's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Lebron Safari 2014

    Yeah, just glad it's not only on my end. Guessing it's a glitch of some sort.

    Also, felt the need to let everybody know I successfully purchased the t-shirt at the top of the page. Gonna rep that shit everywhere.

  15. #2530
    i'm THAT dude jay_em's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Lebron Safari 2014

    Quote Originally Posted by CavsRules View Post
    My favorite quote during that video: "He could have recruited people to Cleveland" - Chris Webber.

    That's been said before, but I think it needs to be stamped in everybody's mind. LeBron didn't want to stay in Cleveland regardless about winning or losing.

    EDIT: Anybody else see pages 170 and 171? I click them and it brings me right back to page 169.

    Problem with that "he could've recruited them to Cleveland" argument is that the Cavs were never in a position to recruit anyone to Cleveland save for that Z,Huges,Marshall,Jones summer and outside of Z we had to overpay each one of them to get them here. The type of players that needed to be recruited to put Cleveland on par with the Celtics, Lakers just weren't available.

    And yes that glich is annoying....Edit...although i now can get to pg 170 *shrug*

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    Default Re: The Lebron Safari 2014

    We could have shed salary and not worried about winning like Dwyane and the Heat did. This component is what irritated me the most about Lebron's departure, he bitched and whined that he wanted to "win now" and would never have accepted the course Miami took to have that kind of cap space available in Cleveland. The tv show, and everything else that upset everyone else didn't bother me at all, what bothered me is that he went to a team that did something he would have never allowed Cleveland to do.

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    Default Re: The Lebron Safari 2014

    LeBron's career as critiqued by PTI through the years:


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    Default Re: The Lebron Safari 2014

    Quote Originally Posted by CavsRules View Post
    My favorite quote during that video: "He could have recruited people to Cleveland" - Chris Webber.

    That's been said before, but I think it needs to be stamped in everybody's mind. LeBron didn't want to stay in Cleveland regardless about winning or losing.

    EDIT: Anybody else see pages 170 and 171? I click them and it brings me right back to page 169.
    It's not like the Cavs were in a position to get anyone here, except for Amare, but the Suns back out on us. He could have recruited Bosh, and likely he did try to do that, but Bosh likely said F NO, and LeBron didn't want to be stuck on a team that had no real future entering his prime.

    With that said IF Bosh said he would have come to Cleveland, and LeBron still took "his talents to South Beach" then it's time for me to start hating him again. I don't see that as likely though.

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    Default Re: The Lebron Safari 2014

    Quote Originally Posted by Mdog1 View Post
    It's not like the Cavs were in a position to get anyone here, except for Amare, but the Suns back out on us. He could have recruited Bosh, and likely he did try to do that, but Bosh likely said F NO, and LeBron didn't want to be stuck on a team that had no real future entering his prime.

    With that said IF Bosh said he would have come to Cleveland, and LeBron still took "his talents to South Beach" then it's time for me to start hating him again. I don't see that as likely though.
    Bosh would have gone wherever LeBron would have gone. Think about it:

    Wade: "Hey Chris, come to Miami...you have me, and I have 2-3 great years left. We'll play in front of fans who like our team. You also have Udonis Haslem. And Erik Spolestra is our coach! Championship!"

    LeBron: "Hey Chris, come to Cleveland. I know...the weather and nightlife isn't the same as Miami, but listen. We just hired Byron Scott, a guy with Finals experience as both a player and coach. Mike Miller has already said he'd coming aboard. We have an energetic big man who will do your dirty work for you down low. We have four of the top fifteen (and two of the top three) three point shooters in the league to kick out to when you get doubled. The Eastern Conference in ripe for the taking too - Boston's getting old, Howard's going to bolt Orlando, the Knicks are the Knicks, and we can take out the Bulls. And Chris, here's the crazy part...if we win a championship here, we'll be treated like GODS for the rest of our lives. They are desperate to win one and will sell out the Q every night. We're talking jersey retirements, statues, the whole nine yards. Come to Cleveland."

    Of course, the three playing in Miami was planned almost a year in advance (at least), which is why Miami cleared the decks to make it happen in Wade's walk year.

    LeBron never even made a pitch to Bosh to come to Cleveland. His meetings with GM's were for attention, to build up to "The Decision"...he was going to Miami all along.

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    Default Re: The Lebron Safari 2014

    Not to beat a dead horse but I caught a bit of Miami/Brooklyn last night during breaks of the Cavs game (while my kids were running around destroying the house). The Nets were way ahead at one point and during the Heat comeback LeBron made a great hustle play laying himself on the ground chasing after a loose ball. It was the type of play that would've garnered a huge standing O at the Q. The Heat announcers..damn are they obnoxious... made a big deal about the best player in the NBA hustling his ass off but the reaction of the crowd on my tv seemed meh. It just struck me how LeBron, as he was walking out the door, basically said the Cavs fans were 'spoiled' by his play yet the fans in Miami certainly don't fully appreciate his play or their team. It still burns my hide how those 'fans' have been gifted Shaq and LeBron in their primes.

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